A History of the Miller Park Duplex Historic District in North Omaha

Immediately after World War II, there was a rush of soldiers flush with government money that allowed them to buy homes and build families right away. A lot of North Omaha finished in-filling during this period, with houses constructed in just a few months and selling a lot quicker than that. Spread across a few streets in the Miller Park neighborhood, one set of these homes created an architecturally distinct area that should be designated as a historic district and preserved quickly.

 

Built in 1944, this duplex is at 5813 North 27 Street.

Homes for the Troops

A housing shortage led developers to get creative in some parts of the community. In the Miller Park neighborhood, they created several blocks of multi-family duplexes surrounding shared parks. These homes, which I’m calling the Miller Park Duplex Historic District, are located on Laurel Avenue and Himebaugh Avenue, between North 27th Street and 24th Street.

 

5819 North 27th Street was built in 1947.

Over these two blocks, there are more than 20 duplexes, each designed with slight variations from the other, with one-and two-story units. All of them were built in the 1940s.

In the two-story units, each side has three bedrooms and one bathroom. There are concrete stoops on them, and some have porch roofs. The single story duplexes have two bedrooms and a bathroom.

 

This is 2450 and 2452 Himebaugh, built in 1944.

I grew up a block away from these duplexes, and I remember being mystified by the central parkland between them. When I was young, this area was overgrown and unpleasant. It was also made known that we shouldn’t go back there. However, that led some friends and I into the space in the early 1990s. We found rusted playground sets and wood on the ground, and nothing that would indicate anything of significance.

 

2579 Laurel Avenue was built in 1944.

Talking with the older people at Pearl Church when I was in my late teens, I was told there had been gardens and picnic tables in the open space. It was never really developed though. At some point after their construction, many of the duplexes did have detached garages built in their backyards; few survive today.

 

5805 North 27th Street was built in 1944. This picture doesn’t do its current appearance justice – its been painted bright pink!

To think of these spaces in the 1950s, packed with young families and aspiring parents! Flowers and gardens in the mornings, sandboxes and swing sets abounding during the day, and picnics and fireflies mixed at evening times. Kids shooed off to Miller Park School in the fall, and ice skates carried to the Miller Park Pond in the winter. Walking to the grocery store at North 24th and Laurel, or pulling into the Phillips 66 at North 24th and Himebaugh to gas up for a Saturday morning drive…

Local or National Landmarks?

I’m taking the privilege of naming these homes the Miller Park Duplex Historic District. There are 19 buildings comprising 38 homes clustered on two blocks with a shared park in between the duplexes.

Built in 1944, this duplex sits at 2426 and 2428 Himebaugh Avenue.

The Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission says that they may qualify for to be designated as Omaha Landmarks, which would make wreckless redevelopment a little harder. One report suggests, “An intensive evaluation of the area would assist in assessing integrity and determining historic boundaries. This collection of duplexes does not appear to meet the criteria for listing in the National Register as a historic district.”

 

This is 5809 North 27th Street, which was built in 1944.

For years, many of these homes have provided Section 8 housing, and their condition is shady at best. However, as other deteriorated historic properties in Omaha have shown, money fixes everything and these homes could be great again.

 

This is an aerial comparison of the Miller Park Duplex Historic District in 1930, 1950 and 2016. Green indicates contributing properties.

Contributing Properties

There are 19 duplexes in the Miller Park Duplex Historic District. They are:

  1. 5816 and 5818 North 24th Street
  2. 5810 and 5812 North 24th Street
  3. 5802 and 5804 North 24th Street
  4. 2408 and 2410 Himebaugh Avenue
  5. 2412 and 2414 Himebaugh Avenue
  6. 2418 and 2420 Himebaugh Avenue
  7. 2426 and 2428 Himebaugh Avenue
  8. 2430 and 2432 Himebaugh Avenue
  9. 2438 and 2440 Himebaugh Avenue
  10. 2442 and 2444 Himebaugh Avenue
  11. 2450 and 2452 Himebaugh Avenue
  12. 5801 and 5803 North 27th Street
  13. 5805 and 5807 North 27th Street
  14. 5809 and 5811 North 27th Street
  15. 5815 and 5817 North 27th Street
  16. 5819 and 5821 North 27th Street
  17. 2585 and 2587 Laurel Avenue
  18. 2581 and 2583 Laurel Avenue
  19. 2577 and 2579 Laurel Avenue
There is a lot of potential for historic preservationists in Miller Park’s residential areas, and these duplexes show one reason why. As historic preservation is embraced by Omahans, its essential that the City steps up and meets people where they want to be – in historic homes like these!

Related Articles

Elsewhere Online

BONUS PICS

 

This may be 5801 North 27th Street, built in 1944. Its at the corner of North 27th and Himebaugh Avenue.

3 thoughts on “A History of the Miller Park Duplex Historic District in North Omaha

Add yours

  1. Thanks for sharing this, it was a nice to revisit this area I live in as a kid. My family lived in a duplex on Himebaugh, just across the street from my Grandmother, and two doors down from my Aunt. How a family with 4 kids did it is beyond me. Many years later we moved into another duplex on 27th Street until my folks finally bought a house. Whew!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: