“FRAMED” Chapter 13 by Michael Richardson

In Michael Richardson’s book FRAMED, Chapter 13 exposes detail galore. This chapter shows how!

“FRAMED” Chapter 12 by Michael Richardson

This is Chapter 12 of FRAMED by Michael Richardson. In it, the author explores the role of Duane Peak and the FBI in the resulting coverup.

“FRAMED” Chapter 10 by Michael Richardson

“Angry Policemen Seek Deadly House Bomber,” screamed the Omaha World-Herald. 25 people in North Omaha were arrested. Here’s the actual list of suspects compiled by the Omaha Police Department. Discover what happened on the day patrolman Larry Minard, Sr. was killed.

“FRAMED” Chapter 9 by Michael Richardson

Adam’s Note: This is Chapter 9 in the series on NorthOmahaHistory.com called Framed: J. Edgar Hoover, COINTELPRO and the Omaha Two Story. It was written by Michael Richardson. Learn more here.   “I will never ever forgive the Black Panther Party for that.” —Ed Poindexter on being called a police agent   On July 2, 1970, a […]

“FRAMED” Chapter 8 by Michael Richardson

This is FRAMED Chapter 8 by Michael Richardson, exposing the history of the FBI framing of the Omaha Two.

“FRAMED”: Chapter 7 by Michael Richardson

This is Chapter 7 of FRAMED by Michael Richardson, detailing the blatant framing of Mondo we Langa and Ed Pointdexter in the years before 1971.

“FRAMED” Chapter 4 by Michael Richardson

The fourth chapter of FRAMED by Michael Richardson continues detailing the FBI cover-up of Black Panthers in Omaha.

A History of Ak-Sar-Ben in North Omaha

Examining the rise and fall of North Omaha requires a long and complicated journey through politics, culture, economics and more. One of the important early anchors of the community demonstrated the ability of one organization to steer things astray.   Opening the Coliseum     Built in 1879, the Coliseum was located at 2226 North […]

A History of North Omaha’s Kountze Park, Once Called Malcolm X Park

Malcolm X Memorial Park sits in the heart of North Omaha’s Kountze Place. Discover why you don’t hear about it anymore.

A History of Zion Baptist Church in North Omaha

A leader among the bedrock institutions of North Omaha is Zion Baptist Church. One of the oldest congregations in Omaha, it was founded in 1884 and became the largest Black church in Omaha by 1900. It’s landmark building at 2215 Grant Street was designed by North Omaha native “Cap” Clarence Wigington, and its mission is still distinctly relevant more than 125 years after it was founded.

Dynamic Past, Hope-filled Future: North Omaha History, Volume Three Now On Sale!

(Olympia, WA: December 1, 2016) The final book of Adam Fletcher Sasse’s series, North Omaha History: Volume Three, is now available from CommonAction Publishing. In the third book of the North Omaha History Series, Adam Fletcher Sasse reveals a lot of the hidden, denied and neglected history of one of the oldest areas of Nebraska’s largest city. Highlighting the […]

A History of the Gold Coast Historic District in Omaha

From 1880 through the 1920s, Omaha’s new Gold Coast neighborhood was the opulent address in Omaha. Starting with Gilded Age mansions, it evolved into a mixed income neighborhood with wealthy and manager level classes.

A History of the Case of Rice and Poindexter in North Omaha

Omaha, Nebraska, was founded on white supremacy. Since then, both formal and informal forces throughout the city have worked continuously to impose, maintain and expand white supremacy throughout the city, state and nation. The stories of Mondo we Langa and Ed Poindexter are examples of what that looks like. Understood in the context of North Omaha history, it is easy to see they aren’t the only examples; however, they are among the most powerful.

People from North Omaha History

This is a timeline of people from the history of North Omaha. They include people from political, legal, religious, medical, and other professions who transformed the community in countless ways. There are also creative leaders, sports figures, and others, too.

A History of Early 20th Century Crime Bosses in North Omaha

In a time of mobland gangsters, illegal booze, dirty gambling halls and open prostitution, several African Americans rose high enough in Omaha’s criminal underworld to become the crime lords of North Omaha.

A History of the 24th and Lake Historic District in North Omaha

North Omaha is screaming full of history, and the new 24th and Lake Historic District is a tremendous example of how that’s so. After its first developments in the 1870s, this intersection evolved to become a hotbed of the African American community; as well as the heart of the Jewish community; a farm supply area; and much, much more. In 2016, 38 buildings were included in a new listing on the National Register of Historic Places. This article is an introduction to the powerful, poignant past of a large jewel in North Omaha’s historical crown.

A History of North Omaha’s Long School Neighborhood

The Long School neighborhood is located in North Omaha from Hamilton Street on the south to Erskine on the North; North 24th on the east and the North Freeway on the west, and it has a total of 30 blocks. Houses started getting built in the neighborhood as early as the 1860s. However, it wasn’t until Long School was built that things really got underway. This is a history of the neighborhood.

A History of the Omaha Star

More than 65 years ago, a newspaper was launched to serve Omaha’s African American community. Coming from a legacy of several Black newspapers before it, the paper was launched by the visionary Mildred Brown and her husband Ed Gilbert. Losing its direct competitors within a decade, The Omaha Star became the city’s Civil Rights media champion, refusing to print negative news and constantly focusing on keeping it positive. The original banner was “Joy and Happiness”, and the only told good news.

A Biography of Nebraska Territorial Governor Thomas B. Cuming by Ryan Roenfeld

One of North Omaha’s landmark roadways that has always intrigued me is Cuming Street. My dad used to take my brother and I to Canfield’s, where we’d comb the aisles for what seemed like hours. Creighton University seemed like a foreign land, but in high school I discovered Bemis Park and began lulling in the […]

A History of 16th and Locust Historic District in North Omaha

The N. 16th and Locust Street intersection was a beehive of commercial activity for more than a century. The Locust overpass of the MoPac Railroad was a key. Learn more.

A History of the John E. Reagan House in North Omaha

With the old country ties in mind, one lawyer in Omaha took it upon himself to bring some fellow Irishmen back to Omaha to stump for “Cowboy” Jim Dahlman, Omaha’s corrupt longtime mayor who was controlled by local boss Tom Dennison. Did his tireless campaigning get him a seat in the Nebraska State Legislature? Was there dirty money involved in building his palatial home?

A History of North Omaha’s Kellom Pool

The Near North Side neighborhood was packed with people for more than a century. People need places to hang out and cool off in Omaha’s hot summers, and in the late 1940s the City of Omaha Parks Department decided to build a swimming pool to serve the community. By this point, the Logan Fontenelle Housing […]

A Biography of North Omaha’s George B. Lake

There is a street that starts in North Omaha and shoots west, with a man so respected by Omahans that more than a century later they named another street after him. North Omaha has been filled with interesting people since the city was founded, and even before that. One of them was Judge George Baker Lake.

A Timeline of Race and Racism in North Omaha

On October 24, 1889, the Omaha Daily World reported that G.S. Kennedy, an African American mechanic who frequented the bar at the Paxton Hotel, was “somewhat indignant” for being charged a higher price than usual because, as the bartender said, he was Black. My review of other articles from early Omaha shows wasn’t Kennedy’s experience wasn’t exception in […]