Categories
19th century 20th century 21st century Ames Ave Apartments architecture civic infrastructure Demolished buildings Demolished buildings economics Historic houses historic preservation houses Monmouth Park neighborhoods Normal house history schools White flight

A History of Monmouth Park Neighborhood in North Omaha

One neighborhood in North Omaha had a hospital, a half-dozen churches and businesses galore, and a long history. Then it all seemed to disappear. This is a history of the Monmouth Park neighborhood.

Categories
19th century 20th century 21st century African Americans Americans architecture civic infrastructure culture Demolished buildings economics Education ethnic groups government historic preservation History of Nebraska Long School Lost history Monmouth Park Near North Side North Omaha Politics poverty Race riot schools Segregation society White flight

A History of Segregated Schools in Omaha, Nebraska

There were and are many segregated schools in Omaha, and this is an account of their history.

Categories
19th century 20th century 21st century African Americans Ames Ave architecture Belt Line Railway economics historic preservation houses Lost history Monmouth Park neighborhoods North 30th Omaha Municipal Land Bank Politics poverty racism society White flight

A History of North Omaha’s Collier Place Neighborhood

The story of a historic neighborhood in North Omaha.

Categories
20th century Ames Ave civic infrastructure culture Lost history Monmouth Park schools White flight

A History of Monmouth Park Elementary School in North Omaha

Monmouth Park School was open for 80 years, leaving indelible marks on the soul of North Omaha forever.

Categories
19th century 20th century 21st century civic infrastructure culture economics historic preservation history industry Monmouth Park society White flight

A History of the North 30th and Ames Commercial District

The intersection of North 30th and Ames Avenue was an important suburban crossroads in North Omaha as early as the 1890s and going all the way into the 1960s. Then, with white flight in full force and North Omaha divestment underway, the intersection started to struggle. Today, it continues to flounder, but many businesses stay open, overcoming the negative, challenging and demeaning perceptions many Omaha’s have about the community.