A History of the Intersection at North 40th and Hamilton Streets

The intersection of 40th and Hamilton has a rich legacy affecting several neighborhoods…

A History of Railroads in North Omaha

Its an understatement to say that railroads helped build North Omaha; they were absolutely vital. Here’s a summary of their history.

A History of the 24th and Fort Intersection in North Omaha

This is a history of the buildings at North 24th and Fort Streets in the Miller Park neighborhood.

A History of the North Omaha Gene Eppley Boys Club

The North Omaha Gene Eppley Boys’ Club was the cradle of youth engagement for a generation of young men. This is a history of the facility.

A History of North Omaha’s J.J. Pershing Drive and Monument

On Veterans Day, 1941, there was a giant parade for the dedication of a new monument to honor the life of John J. Pershing, General of the Armies during World War I. The City of Omaha named a new roadway leading from Abbott Drive to River Drive after him, as well. This is the story

Dynamic Past, Hope-filled Future: North Omaha History, Volume Three Now On Sale!

(Olympia, WA: December 1, 2016) The final book of Adam Fletcher Sasse’s series, North Omaha History: Volume Three, is now available from CommonAction Publishing. In the third book of the North Omaha History Series, Adam Fletcher Sasse reveals a lot of the hidden, denied and neglected history of one of the oldest areas of Nebraska’s largest city. Highlighting the […]

A History of the Case of Rice and Poindexter in North Omaha

Omaha, Nebraska, was founded on white supremacy. Since then, both formal and informal forces throughout the city have worked continuously to impose, maintain and expand white supremacy throughout the city, state and nation. The stories of Mondo we Langa and Ed Poindexter are examples of what that looks like. Understood in the context of North Omaha history, it is easy to see they aren’t the only examples; however, they are among the most powerful.

A History of the North 30th and Ames Commercial District

The intersection of North 30th and Ames Avenue was an important suburban crossroads in North Omaha as early as the 1890s and going all the way into the 1960s. Then, with white flight in full force and North Omaha divestment underway, the intersection started to struggle. Today, it continues to flounder, but many businesses stay open, overcoming the negative, challenging and demeaning perceptions many Omaha’s have about the community.

The History of An Unsolved Murder in North Omaha

Adam’s note: I’m a little hesitant to share this story, but I’m going to. Bad things happen in communities, and this story is part of North Omaha’s history. I’ve removed family names out of respect for the families involved.   This is Kellom School in 1914. It was located at N. 24th and Paul Streets. […]

A History of North Omaha’s Pries Lake

Here’s Pries Lake from a 1910s postcard.  The hills around North Omaha’s Florence neighborhood have kept their share of wealthy country homes, fancy gentlemen’s farms and old settlements hidden since the 1840s. However, one of the most popular places that ever existed in the area was a picnic resort that’s completely forgotten today. Its not […]

A History of the Woman in White in North Omaha

A 1912 pic by Homer Frohardt of his aunt’s grave at Prospect Hill.”Where are my children? Are they buried in that tomb?”H. P. Stanwood was an early and popular sculptor and marble cutter in Omaha. Building a house a shop across the street from the city’s first cemetery, Prospect Hill, he sold a lot of headstones […]

A History of North Omaha’s Immanuel Hospital

Immanuel Hospital has been an institution in North Omaha for a long time. Originally located in the far northern part of the city of Omaha, it was intended to serve the burgeoning population in the section centered around N. 30th and Ames Avenue.

The Future of North Omaha History

A 1931 picture of Pilgrim Baptist Church’s Vacation Bible School.The history of North Omaha doesn’t belong to any single person or organization. Instead, it belongs to the entire community, and ironically, it belongs to the future.Within the next few years, there is going to be a surge of interest in North Omaha’s history. More people […]