A History of Omaha’s Urban League

A hallowed history unlike any other organization in the state, the Urban League of Nebraska is committed to, “…lead Nebraska in closing the social economic gap in the African American, other emerging ethnic communities and disadvantaged families in the achievement of social equality and economic independence and growth.”From the official Urban League of Nebraska website […]

A History of Sulphur Springs, Nebraska

Sulphur Springs was a settlement in the Nebraska Territory from 1854 to 1877. This article shares some of its history.

A History of The Sherman Apartments

This is a history of one of North Omaha’s most important historical landmarks, The Sherman apartments on North 16th Street.

A History of Omaha’s North Downtown

This is a history of Omaha’s North Downtown neighborhood.

A History of Omaha’s Winspear Triangle

The Winspear Triangle was a contested land north of downtown, filled with poor people, planned with poor ideas and barely actualized in the present times.

“FRAMED” Chapter 22 by Michael Richardson

In this chapter, Mondo we Langa is quoted saying “…they simply could not let an African man who called police “pigs” get away with that.”

A History of Segregated Schools in Omaha, Nebraska

There were and are many segregated schools in Omaha, and this is an account of their history.

A History of Ak-Sar-Ben in North Omaha

Examining the rise and fall of North Omaha requires a long and complicated journey through politics, culture, economics and more. One of the important early anchors of the community demonstrated the ability of one organization to steer things astray.   Opening the Coliseum     Built in 1879, the Coliseum was located at 2226 North […]

A History of North Omaha’s Kountze Park, Once Called Malcolm X Park

Malcolm X Memorial Park sits in the heart of North Omaha’s Kountze Place. Discover why you don’t hear about it anymore.

A History of Truck Farms in East Omaha

One part of Omaha has stayed in touch with its agricultural roots for more than a century. This is a history of small family farms and the changing landscape in East Omaha.

A History of Railroads in North Omaha

Its an understatement to say that railroads helped build North Omaha; they were absolutely vital. Here’s a summary of their history.

Dynamic Past, Hope-filled Future: North Omaha History, Volume Three Now On Sale!

(Olympia, WA: December 1, 2016) The final book of Adam Fletcher Sasse’s series, North Omaha History: Volume Three, is now available from CommonAction Publishing. In the third book of the North Omaha History Series, Adam Fletcher Sasse reveals a lot of the hidden, denied and neglected history of one of the oldest areas of Nebraska’s largest city. Highlighting the […]

A History of KOWH, North Omaha’s Radio Station

In the aftermath of the 1960s riots that ravaged the community, a group of African American investors from North Omaha rallied to invest in technology, and for many, to invest in their home neighborhood. Pulling off a coup, for almost a decade, North Omaha was home to Nebraska’s first radio station and a former bastion of white middle class American culture. Except now it was the home of the city’s Black pride, empowerment and culture.

A History of the Central Park Neighborhood in North Omaha

Tucked away in North Omaha is a historic neighborhood that gets little attention. However, the people who’ve lived there have vibrant memories and meaningful stories that lasted a lifetime. The Central Park neighborhood extends from North 33rd to North 48th Streets, from Ames Avenue to Sorenson Parkway. Located west of the town of Saratoga, it was never an incorporated town like its neighbors in Irvington or Benson. A lot of the oral histories of the area talked about it being a rural community, surrounded by farms and fields, orchards and more. Rising from cornfields and hills, the Central Park neighborhood has a long history starting in the 1880s. Here are details I could find about the neighborhood.

A History of North Omaha’s Elks Hall and Iroquois Lodge 92

Starting in 1905, the Improved Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of the World, also called the black Elks, met in North Omaha. They were determined to help foster positive social connections, build community and foster growth within Omaha’s African American community. Almost 100 years later, it keeps going.

A History of African American Newspapers in Omaha

North Omaha’s African American culture has grown and changed dramatically since its founding in 1854. One of the main drivers of the culture for more than a century has been the Black media. From the time Omaha’s first Black newspaper was published in 1889 through Shanelle Williams’ continued use of Facebook, Twitter and other social media today to build the African American community in Omaha, Black media has continued to transform the North Omaha community and the city at large.