Categories
20th century 21st century Ames Ave Belt Line Railway business Demolished buildings Food industry

A History of Uncle Sam Breakfast Food Company

For 75 years, Uncle Sam cereal was manufactured in North Omaha. This is a history of the company and its locations in the community.

Categories
19th century 20th century Ames Ave architecture Churches Lost history religion Segregation White flight

A History of North Omaha’s Covenant Presbyterian Church

The Covenant Presbyterian Church was located in North Omaha for almost 100 years. Learn more here…

Categories
19th century 20th century 21st century Ames Ave business economics Florence history Lost history Pioneer era wealthy

A History of the North Side Bank

The North Side Bank was a pioneer-era fixture that lasted in the the 1990s! Here’s its history.

Categories
19th century 20th century 21st century African Americans Ames Ave architecture Belt Line Railway economics historic preservation houses Lost history Monmouth Park neighborhoods North 30th Omaha Municipal Land Bank Politics poverty racism society White flight

A History of North Omaha’s Collier Place Neighborhood

The story of a historic neighborhood in North Omaha.

Categories
20th century 21st century African Americans Ames Ave architecture civic infrastructure culture Education government history North Omaha Organizations Saratoga

A History of the Public Library in North Omaha

This is a history of the Charles B. Washington North Branch of the Omaha Public Library.

Categories
20th century Ames Ave Black businesses business culture Grocery store Lost history nightlife North 24th Street Organizations Saratoga society

A History of King Solomon’s Mines in North Omaha

This is a history of King Solomon’s Mines, a nightclub open at 2425 Ames Avenue in North Omaha from 1970-1972.

Categories
20th century Ames Ave civic infrastructure culture Lost history Monmouth Park schools White flight

A History of Monmouth Park Elementary School in North Omaha

Monmouth Park School was open for 80 years, leaving indelible marks on the soul of North Omaha forever.